Buckingham Covers - First Day Covers

Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain

Prices and Options

Name Price
Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain, unsigned £35.00 Buy Now
Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain, multi-signed by 4 George Cross winners £75.00 Buy Now
Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain, signed by Tony Gledhill GC £45.00 Sold Out
Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain, signed by Tony Gledhill GC & Ian Blair £45.00 Sold Out

Product Information

 

  • Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain
  • Featuring a stunning image of a police dog
  • And a New Scotland Yard postmark (5th February, 2008)
  • Available signed by Tony Gledhill GC
  • Double signed by Tony Gledhill GC & Ian Blair
  • Or signed by four George Cross Winners


Issue Date: 05/02/2008

Issue Name: Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain

Producer: Buckingham Covers

 

This lovely set of stamps celebrates "working dogs". Our cover celebrates Police Dogs and features all 6 working dog stamps along with our New Scotland Yard, London SW1 'pawprint' postmark. It is available signed by policeman Tony Gledhill GC. He won the George Cross for tackling a notorious armed East End gang in the 1960s. It is also available signed by 4 amazing policemen, all of whom won the George Cross for their outstanding bravery.

 

  • Working Dogs - Centenary of Police Dogs in Britain
  • Featuring a stunning image of a police dog
  • And a New Scotland Yard postmark (5th February, 2008)
  • Available signed by Tony Gledhill GC
  • Double signed by Tony Gledhill GC & Ian Blair
  • Or signed by four George Cross Winners

 

This cover was automatically reserved for anyone in our Buckingham Signed and Unsigned club at the lowest possible price

Find out more about our clubs here

Already in one of these clubs - you can relax! This cover was automatically reserved for anyone in our Buckingham Signed and Unsigned club

 

Working Dogs

The first British police dogs section went on patrol at Hull Docks in early 1908, thanks to the determination of Superintendent J Dobie of the North Eastern Railway Police.

Initially there were four dogs, Vic, Jim, Ben and Mick. Each dog was trained at Hull where kennels had been built and were looked after by a PC who had been a gamekeeper before joining the force. The scheme was so successful that later that year it was extended to Hartlepool, Tyne and Middlesborough docks. The effectiveness and accomplishment of the team of dogs opened our eyes to the ability and value of these animals.

 

Want to see our all the covers in our 3rd Series? View them all here

 

Tony Gledhill GC won Britain's highest civilian gallantry medal, the George Cross for tackling a notorious armed East End gang in the 1960s. 

 

Ian Warwick Blair, Baron Blair of Boughton, QPM is a retired British policeman who held the position of Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis from 2005 to 2008 and was the highest-ranking officer within the Metropolitan Police Service.

 

BC319SP - signed by the following 4 George Cross Winners

 

Tony Gledhill GC won Britain's highest civilian gallantry medal, the George Cross for tackling a notorious armed East End gang in the 1960s. 

 

Henry William Stevens

On 29th March 1958, while patrolling with another constable, they received a message to investigate a suspected break-in at a house in Bickley (Kent). When they arrived at the scene, Stevens went around to the rear of the house when he saw a man climb over the fence of the house. Stevens chased after the man and was only a few yards away when the man turned around and shot Stevens in the mouth.

Despite his injury, Stevens continued to chase the man back around the house and onto the road. Finally catching up with the man Stevens, who was suffering from loss of blood, managed to grasp the man but the man slipped out of his coat. By this time, two other policemen had come to Stevens assistance and the man was finally arrested.

 

Carl Walker

On 23rd August 1971, an armed gang raided a jeweller's shop in Blackpool. Following the robbery, a prolonged chase occurred involving several unarmed police cars. Superintendent Richardson was shot in the stomach, whilst attempting to persuade one of the robbers to surrender his weapon. Richardson died from his injuries later that day.

During the chase, Constable Walker blocked the path of the robber's car with his own police car. However, the robbers reversed their car, smashing into the side of Walker's car. Despite suffering from shock, Constable Walker ran after the robbers until he was shot in the groin.

 

James Wallace Beaton

On the evening of 20th March 1974, Princess Anne (daughter of Queen Elizabeth II) and her then husband Captain Mark Phillips were returning to Buckingham Palace. During this journey, an armed attempt was made to kidnap Princess Anne. Inspector Beaton was hit twice and fell unconsicous as he and three passers-by managed to foil the kidnap attempt.

The citation for Inspector (later Chief Superintendent) Beaton's George Cross was published in the London Gazette (dated 27th September 1974) and read as follows:

"At about 8 p.m. on 20th March 1974, Her Royal Highness The Princess Anne and Captain Mark Phillips were returning to Buckingham Palace from an official engagement. Their car was being driven by Mr. Callender and they were accompanied by Princess Anne's personal Police Officer, Inspector Beaton, and her Lady-in-Waiting.

As the Royal car approached the junction of the Mall with Marlborough Road, a white car swerved in front of it, causing Mr. Calender to stop suddenly. Leaving the vehicle, the driver went to the Royal car and Inspector Beaton, who was seated in the front passenger seat, got out to see what was wrong. As Inspector Beaton approached, the man pointed a revolver at him and fired, wounding him in the shoulder. Despite his wound the Inspector drew his pistol and fired at the man, but the shot missed. He was unable to fire again as his gun jammed, and as he moved to the nearside of the car and tried to clear the stoppage

the gunman told him to drop his weapon, or he would shoot Princess Anne. As he was unable to clear the weapon the officer placed it on the ground. The gunman was trying to open the rear offside door of the Royal car and was demanding that Princess Anne went with him, but Princess Anne and Captain Phillips were struggling to keep the door closed. As soon as the Lady-in-Waiting left by the rear nearside door Inspector Beaton entered the same way, and leant across to shield Princess Anne with his body. Captain Phillips managed to close the door and the Inspector, seeing that the man was about to fire into the back of the car, put his hand up to the window directly in the line of fire to absorb the impact of the bullet. The gunman fired, shattering the window, and the officer was wounded in the right hand by the bullet and by broken glass. Despite his wounds the Inspector asked Captain Phillips to release his grip on the door so that he might kick it open violently to throw the man off balance. However, before he could do so, the man opened the door and fired at the officer again, wounding him in the stomach. The Inspector fell from the offside door and collapsed unconscious at the gunman's feet".

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