Buckingham Covers - First Day Covers

Post & Go - Spring Flowers

Prices and Options

Name Price
Post & Go - Spring Flowers - Bureau Stamps, unsigned £30.00 Limited Availability
Post & Go - Spring Flowers - Bureau stamps, with a Stampex postmark, unsigned £30.00 Limited Availability
Post & Go - Spring Flowers - Machine stamps, unsigned £30.00 Limited Availability
Post & Go - Spring Flowers - Machine stamps, signed by Sarah Raven £35.00 Buy Now
Post & Go - Spring Flowers - Bureau stamps, signed by Sarah Raven £35.00 Buy Now
Post & Go Spring Flowers - Stampex Postmark, signed by Julia Trickey £40.00 Sold Out

Product Information

 

  • Post & Go - Spring Flowers
  • With a Daventry, Northants postmark (19th February 2014)
  • Available signed by Sarah Raven or Julia Trickey

 


Issue Date: 19/02/2014

Issue Name: Post & Go - Spring Flowers

Producer: Buckingham Covers

 

This lovely cover is the first in the Post & Go series for 2014 and features a set of six 1st class Spring Flower stamps. The stamps focus on Spring Flowers and features the Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis), the Dog Voilet (Viola riviniana), the Wild Daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus), the Primrose (Primula vulgaris), the Lesser Celandine (Ranunculus ficaria) and the Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa).

 

  • Post & Go - Spring Flowers
  • With a Daventry, Northants postmark (19th February, 2014)
  • Available signed by Sarah Raven or Julia Trickey
  • Each stamp features the following Spring Flower:
    • Snowdrop
    • Dog Violet
    • Wild Daffodil
    • Primrose
    • Lesser Celandine
    • Blackthorn

 

This cover was automatically reserved for anyone in our Post & Go Club (signed and unsigned) at the lowest possible price

Find out more about our clubs here

Already in one of these clubs - you can relax! This cover was automatically reserved for anyone in our Post & Go club

 

Post & Go Spring Flowers

The hardened leaf tips of the Snowdrop push up through frozen soil and their flowers carpet the ground between January and April. It is said that the snowdrop became the symbol of hope when Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden. Eve, despairing that winter would never end, saw an angel, who transformed some snowflakes into snowdrops, proving that the winters do eventually give way to the spring.

Lesser celandine is a member of the buttercup family. The name 'celandine' comes from the Greek chelidon meaning swallow, as both are signs of spring, though the flower is first, traditionally on 21st February. It grows in woodland, meadows and hedges especially in damp places. You might think the favourite flower of William Wordsworth wrote no less than three poems about this bright and beautiful flower - The Small Celandine, To the Same Flower and To the Small Celandine.

Primrose, named from the Latin prima rosa meaning 'first rose'. It likes shade and grows well in woodland clearings and hedgerows. April 19th is Primrose Day, the anniversary of the death of Benjamin Disraeli. The primrose was his favourite flower and Queen Victoria supposedly sent him bunches on a regular basis. Primrose flowers are laid at Disraeli's statue at Westminster Abbey on this date every year.

Violets grow in shady places under hedgerows and on the edge of woodland. Its pointed petals are the shape of a dog’s tooth. Its Greek name is Ion. 1000 years ago Athenians adopted it as their badge and wore it to prevent drunkenness. The myth says that when Jupiter was in love with Io, he changed her into a heifer. He thought grass too poor for her to feed on so he created violets for her pleasure. Violet was also the emblem of Napoleonic party, because when Napoleon was in exile in Elba, he was known as Caporal Violette. Since earliest times the violet has been a herbal remedy for sleep.

Wild Daffodil is fairly scarce in the wild, even in the Lake District as most specimens were originally hand-planted. It can have white, cream or yellow petals. It always has a long and yellow central trumpet. Daffodils presage love and happiness. The symbol of Wales, it is worn on St David’s Day, 1st March.

Blackthorn is the earliest flowering tree of the year. The white blooms sometimes look like the disappearing snow along the hedges. It is a traditional hedging plant and is home to many birds and insects. The wood has been used for walking or riding sticks. It has sloes later in the year, which when soaked in gin make a delicious liqueur.

 

Bureau of Machine stamps? What's the difference?

The Bureau released stamps have the serial number ending with the Post & Go number for the series issue. Covers also include the carrier information card for the stamp set.

Machine stamps do not have the same serial number as the bureau stamps, in fact, the serial numbers are continually changing as they are printed.

 

Want to see all our Post & Go Covers? View them all here

 

Julia Trickey is an award winning botanical artist whose glowing watercolours depict the beauty and detail of nature.

 

Sarah Raven is an English gardener, cook, writer and television presenter.

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