Buckingham Covers - First Day Covers

250 Years of the First Voyage of Captain Cook Stamp Cover

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Name Price
250 Years of the First Voyage of Captain Cook Stamp Double Postmarked Cover, unsigned £12.95 Buy Now
250 Years of the First Voyage of Captain Cook Stamp Cover, unsigned £18.50 Buy Now
250 Years of the First Voyage of Captain Cook Stamp Cover, signed by Jonathon Coy £28.50 Limited Availability

Product Information

 

  • 250 Years of the First Voyage of Captain Cook Stamp Cover
  • Featuring all 6 Captain Cook Anniversary stamps
  • Stunning 1792 painting of 'Point Venus' by Captain George Tobin
  • With a special Whitby postmark (16th August, 2018)
  • Available signed by Jonathon Coy


Issue Date: 16/08/2018

Issue Name: 250 Years of the First Voyage of Captain Cook Stamp Cover

Producer: Buckingham Covers

 

This cover showcases an amazing painting by Captain George Tobin (then known as Lieutenant Tobin) called 'Point Venus, The Island of Otahytey', painted in 1792 when he was artist on-board Captain Bligh’s second Breadfruit Voyage. The painting is one of the earliest known to feature the Captain Cook named ‘Point Venus’ and the background shows Bligh’s ship ‘Providence’. One of Cook’s main objectives in his First Voyage was to record the Transit of Venus from the Island of Tahiti, the crew anchored in Matavai Bay on 12th April 1769 where they established an observatory and fortified camp which they called ‘Fort Venus’, at Te Auroa which they later named ‘Point Venus’. They departed Tahiti on 13th July 1769 after collecting their recordings.

These stamps are cancelled by our special Whitby postmark, where The Endeavour was built and where James Cook lodged as an apprentice in the same house where the Captain Cook Memorial Museum is today. It is available signed by British actor Johathon Coy.

 

  • 250 Years of the First Voyage of Captain Cook Stamp Cover
  • Featuring all six Captain Cook Anniversary stamps
  • Stunning 1792 painting of 'Point Venus' by Captain George Tobin
  • With a special Whitby postmark (16th August, 2018)
  • Available signed by Jonathon Coy

 

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Already in one of these clubs - you can relax! This cover was automatically reserved for anyone in our Buckingham Signed and Unsigned club

 

Captain Cook and the Endeavour Voyage

On 25th August 1768, Lt. James Cook and the crew of Endeavour set off on a voyage of discovery. The voyage was a joint venture between the Admiralty and the Royal Society. His Majesty’s Bark Endeavour was a “Whitby cat” – a collier specially chosen for her strength, her capacity for carrying supplies, and her shallow draught that made her ideal for exploring far-off lands. Originally called the Earl of Pembroke, she was bought from Thomas Milner in March 1768, renamed and refitted at Deptford. By 30th July, she was ready to sail to Plymouth where the aristocratic Joseph Banks and his party joined the ship and, a few days later on 25th August, Endeavour set sail on a voyage around the world.

The aim of the voyage was two-fold: firstly, to sail to Tahiti to observe the Transit of Venus – a rare event that would enable astronomers to more accurately map the heavens; secondly, to go in search of Terra Australis Incognita – the vast continent believed to dominate the southern hemisphere. Cook’s orders were to survey the lands he encountered, documenting their geography, people, plants and animals.  The scientists on board included the astronomer Charles Green, Swedish naturalist Daniel Solander and voyage artists Sydney Parkinson and Alexander Buchan. The discoveries, drawings and paintings made on the voyage are still referenced today. Endeavour sailed via Cape Horn into the Pacific, anchoring in Tahiti on 13th April 1769.  The Transit observations were made, though marred by an optical illusion – and, by August 1769, Cook was sailing south in search of the fabled Continent. Land seen by Abel Tasman in 1642 turned out to be the two islands of New Zealand, which Cook charted for the first time. He then headed northwest, sighting the east coast of New Holland (Australia) on 19th April 1770. The men made their first landing in Botany Bay, named for the thousands of new plant species recorded by Banks and Solander. Contact was also made with the Gweagal aborigines. Sailing up the east coast, Endeavour almost foundered on the Great Barrier Reef, limping to land in what is now Cooktown for repairs. Seven weeks later, she escaped the reef and sailed round Cape York to Possession Island where Cook claimed the whole east coast of Australia for Great Britain, naming it New South Wales. After stopping at Batavia (Jakarta) for further repairs, Endeavour arrived home with a crew depleted by dysentery and malaria, anchoring in London on 17th July 1771. While Mr. Banks became famous for his discoveries, Cook was already planning his second voyage to the South Seas.

 

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Jonathon Coy has worked since 1975 largely in television, notably as Henry in the long-running series Rumpole and as Bracegirdle in the television series Hornblower. In 2000 he played the part of Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell in the TV movie Longitude.

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